Chronicles: Pace

I Chronicles 11-II Chronicles 9 covers 80 years of kingly reign, split evenly between two kings.  That’s nearly approaching glacial speeds.  II Chronicles 10-28 on the other hand flies by.  12 kings, 270 years, 19 chapters.  That’s fast.  Kings are filling up chapters or even parts of chapters as the story speeds by.  We’ve already seen how willing the Chroniclers is to shape the story using whatever narrative tools he deems necessary.

So, what intention is expressed in the quick pace of this section?

  • It allows Israel to build a reputation of sin.  Only one of the 12 kings in this period rules without a stain on his record.
  • It sets Israel firmly on the path to judgement.  We’ve known it all along, its just becoming more certain along the way.
  • Perhaps most important of all, the quick pace puts distance between God’s promises to David/Solomon and the current narrative situation, allowing doubt to creep in.  With all this mess, could God really still honor his promises?  Would he really heal us if we turn to him?  Will he still send his king to rule?
As the book progresses, the Chronicler speeds up the pace as a major movement toward the book’s final climax.
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2 Responses to Chronicles: Pace

  1. Pretty rad stuff you have here, Joey. Chronicles has interested me as I learned more and more about the differences between Kings and Chronicles, and just what the Chronicler is doing. Pretty insightful observations.

  2. joewulf says:

    Thanks Cam! I really enjoyed studying Chronicles! I’d never looked at it that closely before.

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